CORONAVIRUS cases are still rising in forty areas in England and this interactive map reveals if your local authority is on the list.

Data from Public Health England (PHE) states that 84 per cent of places have seen a fall in infection rates.

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Mansfield in Nottinghamshire has the highest rate in England, with 108 new cases recorded in the seven days to April 9, the equivalent of 98.8 cases per 100,000 people.

This is up from 97.0 per 100,000 in the seven days to April 2.

Residents in the area have been urged to remain cautious after pubs, gyms and non-essential shops were once again able to reopen on Monday.

Public health bosses in the area previously said that the rise in infections in Mansfield had been due to outbreaks at various schools in the area.

They said cases were being transferred from pupils to parents and accounted for "almost all the increase" in the town.

While Mansfield is the area with the most infections, there are five areas that have seen a significant rise in cases over the last seven days.

The 40 areas where Covid cases are still rising

Cases of Covid-19 are still rising in 40 areas

Below are the areas where cases have increased across England.

The figures are based on cases numbers per 100,000.

The number on the LEFT is cases up to the seven days to April 9 and the number on the RIGHT is the figure from the previous week.

Mansfield, 98.8, (108), 97.0, (106) 

Boston, 81.2, (57), 78.4, (55) 

Wellingborough, 74.0, (59), 66.5, (53) 

Blackburn with Darwen, 70.8, (106), 69.5, (104) 

Fenland, 53.0, (54), 49.1, (50) 

South Ribble, 46.9, (52), 37.0, (41) 

North East Derbyshire, 44.4, (45), 37.5, (38) 

East Riding of Yorkshire, 42.2, (144), 34.6, (118) 

High Peak, 41.0, (38), 34.5, (32) 

Milton Keynes, 37.5, (101), 37.1, (100) 

Warrington, 34.8, (73), 33.3, (70) 

Test Valley, 30.9, (39), 30.1, (38) 

Copeland, 30.8, (21), 16.1, (11) 

Reading, 28.4, (46), 24.1, (39) 

Arun, 26.7, (43), 21.8, (35) 

King's Lynn and West Norfolk, 25.8, (39), 25.1, (38)

Westminster, 24.9, (65), 19.5, (51) 

Ryedale, 23.5, (13), 3.6, (2) 

Hackney and City of London, 23.0, (67), 15.8, (46)

Fylde, 22.3, (18), 14.9, (12) 

Canterbury, 21.2, (35), 16.3, (27) 

Castle Point, 21.0, (19), 17.7, (16) 

Harlow, 20.7, (18), 14.9, (13) 

Isle of Wight, 20.5, (29), 12.0, (17) 

Broxbourne, 19.5, (19), 15.4, (15) 

Adur, 18.7, (12), 17.1, (11) 

Torbay, 18.3, (25), 13.2, (18) 

Brentwood, 18.2, (14), 15.6, (12) 

Dorset, 16.9, (64), 10.6, (40) 

St Albans, 16.8, (25), 14.8, (22) 

Mendip, 16.4, (19), 10.4, (12) 

Harrogate, 16.2, (26), 11.2, (18) 

Rochford, 16.0, (14), 13.7, (12) 

Bath and North East Somerset, 13.5, (26), 9.8, (19) 

East Hertfordshire, 12.7, (19), 11.4, (17)

Tewkesbury, 12.6, (12), 10.5, (10)

Carlisle, 12.0, (13), 8.3, (9)

Waverley, 10.3, (13), 6.3, (8) 

Guildford, 9.4, (14), 8.1, (12) 

Great Yarmouth, 9.1, (9), 8.1, (8)

Ryedale in North Yorkshire has seen a large jump in the last week, going from 3.6 cases per 100,000 to 23.5.

Another area that has seen a significant rise is Copeland in Western Cumbria.

Here cases have jumped from 16.1 per 100,000 to 30.8.

The national average for coronavirus infections currently stands at 27.3 and cases in the surrounding areas of Copeland have also seen an increase in recent days.

Also in the North West and South Ribble, in Lancashire has seen cases jump from 37 to 46.9.

The Isle of Wight has also seen a rise in infections, from 12 to 20.5 per 100,000.

East Riding of Yorkshire has also jumped from 34.6 to 42.2.

While these areas have all seen a significant rise in cases many other parts of England have low infection rates.

North Devon currently has the lowest infection rate in the country and in the last week has fallen from 11.3 cases per 100,000 to zero.

Rother, the Derbyshire Dales, Torridge, Hastings and Stroud also have low infection rates.

The low infection levels come after data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) revealed that 23 per cent of coronavirus fatalities are now people who have died "with" the virus rather than from an infection.

This means the disease was not the primary cause of death recorded on death certificates, despite the person who died testing positive for Covid.

Other data also shows an increasingly positive picture of the state of the pandemic in Britain.

Daily death figures by "date of death" reveal that Britain has had no more than 28 deaths a day since the beginning of April.

Meanwhile, the government announced deaths have been as high as 60.

This is because officials give a daily update on deaths based on the number reported that day, which can include deaths from days or weeks previously.

It means the government figures may not reflect the true decline in deaths.

A further 23 Covid deaths were reported on Tuesday – more than half those recorded a fortnight ago – but the true daily figure could be even lower.

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