Waterfalls that tumble into the sea, mind-boggling mountains and idyllic beaches: Stunning images of the British Isles’ incredible islands

  • There are over 6,000 islands altogether – and here we bring you pictures of some of the most breathtaking
  • This pictorial journey takes in otherworldly waterfalls and a unique cable car that glides over open seawater 
  • The set also includes a Star Wars filming location, idyllic beaches, epic volcanic mountains and remote forts

Dramatic, beautiful, other-worldly, surreal, remote, epic – welcome to the islands of the British Isles.

There are over 6,000 of them altogether and so picturing them all would be a tall order – but here we bring you some of the most breathtaking.

It’s almost guaranteed that you will stare in disbelief at some of these images – the one of the Isle of Skye waterfall that cascades off cliffs into the sea is a contender, as is the photo of Bull Rock, which has a natural tunnel running right the way through it.

You’ll just gaze longingly at others – and probably start Googling accommodation options.

If you do, then that’s our job done, because here we want to give you fodder for a reviving getaway.

And at the very least, the chance to lose yourself in some serious isle-candy…

A stunning aerial image of Channel Island Sark taken by Phillip Capper as he flew over it on a flight from London to Spain. He posted it to Flicker, writing: ‘I had a family holiday here in 1952 and this was the first time I’d seen the island since.’ Photo published here courtesy of Creative Commons licensing

Three-mile-long Lundy Island – which is owned by the National Trust – lies ten miles out in the Bristol Channel. There are no roads, but there is a pub, the Marisco Tavern

An aerial shot of Brownsea Island in Poole Harbour. There is evidence that this 500-acre islet was home to settlers as far back as 5 BC. It has been voted the best nature reserve in the UK

This image shows the 16th-century Lindisfarne Castle, which sits on the two-square-mile tidal island of the Holy Island of Lindisfarne in Northumberland, within an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and connected to the mainland by a three-mile-long causeway. Irish monks settled the island in AD 635 and it became an important centre of Christianity. Some scenes in Polanski’s Macbeth were filmed here

For more on the islands of the British Isles visit www.tourismireland.com and www.visitbritain.org.

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