• As the number of coronavirus cases in the US grows, states and cities are shutting down nonessential businesses and asking residents to self-isolate.
  • On Tuesday, the governor of Nevada ordered nonessential businesses to close for 30 days, leaving Las Vegas looking like a ghost town.
  • Seeing Sin City, a gambling mecca and party hot spot, so empty is particularly unsettling.
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Cities and states around the country are practicing self-isolation or sheltering in place. Nonessential businesses around the US have closed their doors. Streets are empty nationwide.

And while we may start getting used to these apocalyptic images of once-bustling areas now devoid of humans due to the coronavirus, seeing Las Vegas — a gambling mecca and party hot spot — that way is particularly unsettling.

Keep scrolling to see Sin City turned into a ghost town.

As of Thursday, March 19, Nevada has seen 84 confirmed COVID-19, according to Johns Hopkins University of Medicine's Coronavirus Resource Center.

Source: Johns Hopkins University of Medicine

On Tuesday, the state's governor ordered nonessential businesses to close for 30 days, CNN reports.

Source: CNN

Yes, this includes casinos. Only businesses that serve food and provide other essential items or services are allowed to remain open.

Like in many other US cities, restaurants may only do delivery or takeout.

Bars, restaurants, casinos, and gyms were all ordered to close, and people urged to stay at home.

Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn Goodman, however, has pleaded for a shorter shutdown of eight to 10 days.

According to the Las Vegas Sun, she said the 30-day lockdown would "cripple" the state's economy.

Source: Las Vegas Sun

She added that the city would "seek ways for people and businesses to control their own lives, make their own choices, create and follow their own destinies" to provide for their families.

Source: Las Vegas Sun

Las Vegas' economy is particularly dependent on tourism.

Vegas legalized gambling in 1931, as History.com points out. The city now sees around 42 million visitors a year, according to the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority.

Source: Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority, History

According to the Las Vegas Review-Journal, these visitors spent $34.5 billion in Southern Nevada in 2018.

Source: Las Vegas Review-Journal

Many of the city's residents work in hospitality — there are an estimated 234,000 tourism jobs, according to the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority.

Source: Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority

The Las Vegas Review-Journal quotes Stephen Miller, director of UNLV's Center for Business and Economic Research, as saying that Vegas would "probably feel it more than other metro areas" if the coronavirus leads to a recession.

Source: Las Vegas Review-Journal

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