“The Ferryman,” a drama about a former IRA member’s attempts to outrun his past, is one of the hottest tickets on Broadway. It has earned critical raves and previously picked up a boatload of Olivier awards during its London run. “The Ferryman” is also a showcase for a number of notable character actors, including two Irish performing legends, Fionnula Flanagan and Dearbhla Molloy, who portray two eccentric aunts, one a political firebrand, the other a gentle soul who is losing her grasp on reality.

Set during the Troubles, the epic story centers on the family of Quinn Carney, a former activist who gave up the fight for quiet family life in rural Northern Ireland. An unforeseen tragedy upends their peaceful existence, leading to a bloody reckoning. Jez Butterworth, who previously took Broadway by storm with “Jerusalem,” wrote “The Ferryman,” and Sam Mendes, the Oscar-winning filmmaker behind “American Beauty” and “Skyfall,” directs.

Flanagan is best known to audiences for her work on Showtime’s “Brotherhood,” while Molloy was a Tony Award nominee for “Dancing at Lughnasa.” With “The Ferryman,” Molloy earned an Olivier Award for her performance as the Margaret Thatcher-hating Aunt Pat, whereas Flanagan joined the cast as Aunt Maggie “Faraway,” a wheelchair bound woman who occasionally breaks through her dementia to offer oracular pronouncements.

Related

Broadway Review: 'The Ferryman'