Couple at loggerheads over how to modernise their ‘disjointed’ 1970s house finally agree on a £100K open plan design on Your Home Made Perfect – but viewers slam their decision to ditch the ‘cosy lounge’

  • James, 39 and Vicky, 40, from Faversham, Kent, have 1970s house redesigned
  • In last night’s Your Home Made Perfect couple couldn’t agree on what they want
  • Bought their detached house five years ago with two young children in mind
  • The disjointed design means never spend time together and house is cramped
  • Architects show them different designs to open the house up with more light
  • Twitter not convinced on their final design and said it  wasn’t ‘homely’ enough 

A couple on BBC2 renovation show Your Home Made Perfect who say they were essentially living separate lives in their home because of a ‘disjointed’ lay-out were left astonished after an architect gave their 1970s house a very modern re-vamp.    

James, 39, and Vicky, 40, from Faversham, Kent, complained in last night’s episode that they don’t spend enough time together as James loves cooking and Vicky is often with the children in the living room.

A remarkable design make-over to their property by the show’s competing architects included an open plan kitchen and living area – but many viewers said the new plans would leave the family missing their ‘snuggly’ living room. 

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James, 39, and Vicky, 40, from Faversham, Kent, currently live in what they feel is a ‘disjointed’ home and complain that they don’t spend enough time together. They appeared on last night’s episode of Your Home Made Perfect

But despite the family loving it Twitter were less impressed with the transformation and didn’t like how open plan it was 

The couple’s kitchen is cramped, has old furniture and doesn’t gives James enough room to cook and talk to his family 

The kitchen has been completely refurbished with a large island for James to cook at and enough space for the family to live in 

The couple both wanted different things out of the redesign, with James asking for rich, bold colours and a big kitchen, while Vicky favoured lots of storage and whitewashed walls.

They bought their 1970s detached house five years ago with their two young children in mind, as it had a large garden, but they have since discovered the house is completely impractical for family life. 

With two architects showing how their house could be redesigned, using virtual technology, the final design that the couple chose completely transfomed their home but many viewers said they hated the open plan choice the couple plumped for.   

On Twitter, many didn’t like how the living area was now part of the kitchen. 

One viewer said: ‘One day we’ll be sick of open plan, praying for a nice cosy lounge, I don’t wanna watch someone cook.’

‘Surely homely homes will come back into fashion at some point,’ said another.

While some loved the amount of light and another simply said ‘loved, loved, loved the design on #yourhomemadeperfect tonight.  

James said: ‘The things is we live quite separately – as the kitchen and living rooms are so separate.’ 

The couple both want different things out of their new redesign, with James wanting rich, bold colours and a big kitchen, while Vicky wants lots of storage and white washed walls

Instead of the L spaced living room they have knocked down a wall and it is now part of the big living area

But the fact that the couple both want different things hasn’t help them start with their redesign: ‘Its halted our decisions and instead of regressing we just arguing the whole time about what we should be doing,’ says Vicky. 

As the architects assess their home they both see where the problems lie in the current design.

Robert said: ‘You need to transform this existing building in order to get light in.  Understanding of how the sun revolves around your house is key.’

Laura, one of the competing architects, believes how the stairs cut through all the living space on the ground floor means the house doesn’t have workable living spaces and said ‘the key is to change this access’. 

Before the couple decide on which architects’ plans to go with they use virtual reality and visual effects to see what the future of their home could look like, before building it in reality. 

Robert’s version is first – which shows an open living space with a big kitchen, stalls and a table for friends and family and also an island for James’s cooking, while the white washed interiors and storage space please Vicky. 

Before the couple decide on which architect’s plans to go with they use virtual reality and visual effects to see what the future of their home could look like, before building it in reality

Host Angela Scanlon  takes the couple through the redesign and sees the finished result 

The couple love the design that Laura has created as it compliments what the both were hoping for and go with her design

He’s also opened up the house so natural light from midday to sunset can flow around the living space. 

But its Laura’s plan which really astonishes them – she’s opened up the house again so that there is direct access from the front door all the way through the house while the living space is open plan, with a big kitchen and break out areas.

The design feels more modern, with wooden floors, which James was intent on and also shelves for Vicky’s books and records. She’s also transformed the garage into a play area for the children.    

The couple love the design as it compliments what they both were hoping for and go with Laura’s design, much to her delight.

The pantry has closed off the stairs and given them a place to store their food – as James loves to cook

The old hallway was cluttered with the fridge, which didn’t fit in the kitchen, and too much junk

One of the architects believes how the the stairs cut through all the living space on the ground floor means it doesn’t create very nice living spaces and said ‘the key is to change this access’

The couple both want different things out of the redesign, with James wanting rich, bold colours and a big kitchen, while Vicky wanting lots of storage and whitewashed walls

The couple add modern cons into the kitchen and throughout their living space giving it an up to date feel 

 By the end of the show the couple have transformed their home into Laura’s design, with a few of their own touches.

Instead of a small cluttered hallway with a fridge they have opened it up with an extra wide hallway.

‘It seems like a bit of an extravagance to have a big hallway but not when its got all this storage,’ Laura said as she saw it for the first time, ‘and it’s the first place you walk into – you need space to greet each other.’

The hallway goes into their open plan living space, with a super sized kitchen – bathed in light. 

It’s Laura’s plan, the competing architect, which really astonishes them – she’s opened up the house again so that there is direct access from the front door all the way through the house. While the living space is open plan, with a big kitchen and break-out areas

The couple made the table themselves with left over oak and also bought the chairs for £10 each from a hotel which was getting rid of them

James’ island kitchen area is made of three metres of oak, which cost them less than £500 pounds

And it’s clear that James is happy with it: ‘It is everything we possibly could have asked for – I couldn’t be happier.’ 

Instead of carpet they also have oak flooring right through the house and have tweaked Laura’s design – adding teal colours and also sliding doors.

The two sky-lights also really bring in the light to the room, as well as the large windows that also act as seating areas.

Alongside the kitchen is a seating area which they’ve opened up, as well as shelving for cookbooks and her vinyl’s.

James island kitchen area is made of three meters of oak, which cost them less than £500 pounds. 

James and Vicky are left so happy with the design and believe it’s bought them all together as a family.

The architect and couple show host Angela round their redesigned home on the BBC2 show 

Alongside the kitchen is a seating area which they’ve opened up, as well as shelving for cookbooks and her vinyl’s

James and Vicky are left so happy with the design and believe its bought them all together as a family

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